Vintage Garden Syringe Sprayers    

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These sprayers have a large spring which is compressed on the push stroke at the same time as liquid is sprayed through the nozzle. On the pull stroke the spring forces the liquid out through the nozzle, while at the same time more liquid is sucked into the barrel. This gives a continuous spray. The air compression types can suffer from loss of air when the sprayer is tilted during use. The use of a spring avoids this problem. The disadvantage  is that the spring could corrode. The sprayer on which these diagrams is based uses 10mm brass balls in the valves.

SELF SUPPLY - SPRING TYPE

Diagram 1

The plunger is being pulled back. Valve  ‘A’ is open and valve ‘B’ closed. The main barrel is filled with liquid which is drawn in from the container via the supply pipe.  

Diagram 1

Valve B

Valve A

Diagram 2

The plunger is being pushed. Valve  ‘A’ is closed and valve ‘B’ open. Liquid from the main barrel passes through valve B and into the ‘spring’ chamber compressing the spring, and partly filling the chamber, then out through the nozzle via the narrow pipe.

Diagram 3

The plunger is being pulled back. Valve  ‘A’ is open and valve ‘B’ closed. The main barrel is filled with liquid through valve ‘A’. At the same time the spring decompresses forcing the liquid in the ‘spring’ chamber through the narrow pipe and out though the nozzle. During this action there are two separate flows within the  sprayer - one powered by the spring and the other by the pull stroke.


Diagram 2

Diagram 3